Basement Revolver - 'Knocking' and 'Baby'

  Canada’s  Basement Revolver  follow up the release of 'Baby' with 'Knocking' the second song to be taken from their forthcoming album 'Heavy Eyes', due for release via Fear Of Missing Out Records on 24 August.   It's been over two years since Basement Revolver released their debut single, ' Johnny ' and what immediately stood out for me when I reviewed the song was the effortless way I could put movie visuals to their music in my head. Since then, that (mostly) still applies and 'Baby' sky rockets to such spectacular heights it could rival the storytelling of anything you could see in the cinema.  Basement Revolver's songs are more than words and sounds, they are windows into life's most emotional, painful moments and remind me of those artful, evocative climactic scenes in film where romance and angst and longing are deepest, rawest, richest. Those introspective, lonely, weary and self examining moments that tug on the heart strings and remind us of the frailty of the human condition. Those heart-stomping moments that you feel like you'll never recover from.   One of my favourite things about Basement Revolver is that every band member is integral to the sound they are creating. I know that sounds kind of stupid because shouldn't all band members be important to the band? This is different. Basement Revolver are special in that it's really hard to pick a favourite moment or sound or melody from their music. Everyone works like a well oiled machine and you get immersed in their music. But Chrisy Hurn is an incredible front woman. vulnerable and raw, beautiful and gritty. I never tire of hearing her voice, or her storytelling and 'Knocking' is one of the band's most exposed and stripped songs to date.   There's a softer soundscape at work via 'Knocking', which doesn't take away any of its potency. In fact, it really appeals to my fondness for ethereal and ambient folk because of it's organic and relatively sparse composition (without losing its reverby indie rock edge). Hurn's vocal has a lot of space to find catharsis, redemption and fight her demons as 'Knocking' sees her reconnect with her faith and her God. Whether religion plays a part in your life or as in my case, it does not, 'Knocking' really is a gorgeous song that has a way of silencing and soothing its listener. And maybe the reverence and intimacy of the track means its the first one yet that I have not been able to add a film script to in my head.  But you know, in this instance,  I'm more than ok with that.   Words of  Karla Harris       

Canada’s Basement Revolver follow up the release of 'Baby' with 'Knocking' the second song to be taken from their forthcoming album 'Heavy Eyes', due for release via Fear Of Missing Out Records on 24 August.

It's been over two years since Basement Revolver released their debut single, 'Johnny' and what immediately stood out for me when I reviewed the song was the effortless way I could put movie visuals to their music in my head. Since then, that (mostly) still applies and 'Baby' sky rockets to such spectacular heights it could rival the storytelling of anything you could see in the cinema.

Basement Revolver's songs are more than words and sounds, they are windows into life's most emotional, painful moments and remind me of those artful, evocative climactic scenes in film where romance and angst and longing are deepest, rawest, richest. Those introspective, lonely, weary and self examining moments that tug on the heart strings and remind us of the frailty of the human condition. Those heart-stomping moments that you feel like you'll never recover from. 

One of my favourite things about Basement Revolver is that every band member is integral to the sound they are creating. I know that sounds kind of stupid because shouldn't all band members be important to the band? This is different. Basement Revolver are special in that it's really hard to pick a favourite moment or sound or melody from their music. Everyone works like a well oiled machine and you get immersed in their music. But Chrisy Hurn is an incredible front woman. vulnerable and raw, beautiful and gritty. I never tire of hearing her voice, or her storytelling and 'Knocking' is one of the band's most exposed and stripped songs to date. 

There's a softer soundscape at work via 'Knocking', which doesn't take away any of its potency. In fact, it really appeals to my fondness for ethereal and ambient folk because of it's organic and relatively sparse composition (without losing its reverby indie rock edge). Hurn's vocal has a lot of space to find catharsis, redemption and fight her demons as 'Knocking' sees her reconnect with her faith and her God. Whether religion plays a part in your life or as in my case, it does not, 'Knocking' really is a gorgeous song that has a way of silencing and soothing its listener. And maybe the reverence and intimacy of the track means its the first one yet that I have not been able to add a film script to in my head.  But you know, in this instance,  I'm more than ok with that. 

Words of Karla Harris